‘Human power plant’: How the cell’s molecular machines work

Every cell in our body is like a workshop full of machines. The machines are embedded in mitochondrial membranes – microscopic energy centers. They serve to synthesize ATP (adenosine triphosphate) – sort of a fuel for humans that our whole body uses in order to function properly.

Source: ‘Human power plant’: How the cell’s molecular machines work – World

Chuck Berry Took His ‘Ding-a-Ling’ to No. 1: Rewinding the Charts, 1972 | Billboard

The rock‘n’roll legend’s only Billboard Hot 100 chart-topper was a bawdy novelty song that, unlike his other hits, he didn’t write.

Source: Chuck Berry Took His ‘Ding-a-Ling’ to No. 1: Rewinding the Charts, 1972 | Billboard

‘Our Gold’ page

The Nubian News is coming out with its own version of Page 6. Of course we are mandated by a higher calling – Let me introduce our very first model.

If you are 90 years old or older you, too, may become part of ‘Our Gold’ page. Every week we will select a Gold one, take him or her to a professional photography studio, write a bio and present it in the pages of The Nubian News.

Immortalize your loved one send us referral information to have your Gold in The Nubian News future editions.  Remember 90 years or older or too good to pass up at 89.

Oh yeah that’s my Mommy.

Petition · We’re calling on Governor Brown to sign Californian rape survivor civil rights, AB1312, into law

California is close to passing a Sexual Assault Survivors’ Bill of Rights that will guarantee comprehensive, common sense civil rights for survivors like me.

In March of 2015, I was sexually assaulted by a man I was dating. When I tried to stop his unprotected advances, he forced himself on me.

It’s hard to put into words exactly what one goes through after such a trauma. I think the best way to describe my experience is something akin to being on a roller coaster during an earthquake in the midst of a storm.

Source: Petition · We’re calling on Governor Brown to sign Californian rape survivor civil rights, AB1312, into law

New African literature is disrupting what Western presses prize

There is a thriving counter-current of transnational African literary life that confounds rather than caters to an international taste for “digestible” fiction.

African literature is the object of immense international interest across both academic and popular registers. Far from the field’s earlier, post-colonial association with marginality, a handful of star “Afropolitan” names are at the forefront of global trade publishing.

Books like Chimamanda Adichie’s “Americanah” and “Half of a Yellow Sun”, Teju Cole’s “Open City”, Taiye Selasi’s “Ghana Must Go” and Yaa Gyasi’s “Homegoing” have confounded neat divisions between Western and African literary traditions. The Cameroonian novelist Imbolo Mbue captured a million-dollar contract for her first book, “Behold the Dreamers”. That’s even before it joined the Oprah’s Book Club pantheon this year.

Source: New African literature is disrupting what Western presses prize

Secrets of the South

Meet the United Order of Tents, a semi-covert organization of black women.

The women settle back down and the president of this chapter, Lodis Gloston, stands and begins to call out to the members present. “Raise your hand if you are 85 or older,” she says, and about six women raise their hands. “Raise your hand if you are 95 or older,” she says, and three women keep their hands raised. The South Carolina chapter’s oldest member is 106 — Donella Wilson. She was photographed this past November casting her vote for Hillary Clinton. She’s not here tonight, but the oldest woman in attendance is Queen Logan, who is 99 years and nine months old. The Tents give each other honorifics: everyone is Sister, but women who contribute to the organization with the most service are called Queens.

Source: Secrets of the South

Editorial #2 – We Need A Seat At The Table

“If you don’t have a seat at the table you are probably on the menu”.

Back in the day when we didn’t have many choices but to serve, we were told to build a table. So we built a table and some chairs. When we were done we were sent back to our place. We never sat at the table.

It was at the table where so much was decided. Our futures were decided at that table. War and peace was decided at that table. That table saw and decided the path the country would follow. But we never sat at that table. We served it. We heard everything that went on, whether we understood it or not.

But we never had a seat.

Come up to today and there are many tables where we still don’t have a seat.

Do you realize there are thousands of boards, commissions, tribunals, committees, authorities, regulatory bodies, courts, chambers etc. all over the state? Most of these we have never heard anything about. But these bodies dole out millions, nay billions of dollars every year and we don’t know what they’re doing or who they are giving money to.

One thing we know, our communities are not getting any better financially. They are spending $300 million on renovating the state house while saying they will give Trenton $18 million for various projects. Imagine if they spent that $300 million on Trenton and the $18 million on the state house how much different out city would look.

We need seats at the tables where decisions are made as to who get these public funds. I was at a New Jersey Economic Development Authority meeting a few months back. They gave out about $100 million that day. But none to any Black faces.

Sometimes there a African Americans on these Boards but I question whether they are there to represent the Black community or do they think they are there to represent the entire state. I want people who will represent and fight to get our communities and our businesses funds to improve our lot.

It doesn’t seem as though the distribution of wealth has come home to us. This has got to change. We pay our just share of taxes to the state coffers. We need to get our just share of wealth coming back to us.

At the moment, we don’t have the businesses and other structures to utilize all the funds due us. But that’s because of past injustices. The injustices have been long and painful. It has to stop.

Our plan is to sit in on every commission and board and authority and court session brought to order in New Jersey. We intend to bring together a mass of volunteers who will spread out and join in every ‘sit-down’ in the state.

We are going to have a seat at the table. It may not be an official seat but we will know what is going on and we will report back to the community who got what and for what. We’ll also say if there were people who looked like us who actually represented us or they were there for the status quo.

Enough is enough. We may get a Democrat for governor in November. If we do I want to know what he is going to do for us. We’ve supported democrats for ages and now it’s time for them to support us with the same fervor.

So if you are tired of being tired we’ll need your help to do this. We have to roll up our sleeves and dig in. We can, we must do this. The future well-being of our children and grandchildren rests with what we do now.

I’m not easy on me and I’m not going to be easy on you. We have a job to do.

Like Michael said, ‘take a look in the mirror and make a change’.

“Up you mighty race, you can accomplish what you will” Marcus Mosiah Garvey

Editorial #1Why Did We Come Back?

September 8, 2017 - This editorial marks the return of The Nubian News after eleven years.

An African proverb says, “Dreams are voices of ancestors.”

King said, “I have a dream.”

Oscar Hammerstein saidYou gotta have a dream. If you don’t have a dream, how you gonna make a dream come true?

Nigerian proverb: “If I tell you my dream, you might forget it. If I act on my dream, perhaps you will remember it, but if I involve you, it becomes your dream too.”

My dream is that one day we will all be free. My grandchildren will never have to debate whether someone hates them or is holding them hostage because of the color of their skin.

I dream that one day Trenton, this city I love so much, will look and function as the Black Mecca.

As I walk this city I see gleaming streets of gold and houses and homes, beautiful beyond words, with warmth of love and prosperity in every window.

I see people who have thrown off the yolk of pain, loneliness and despair and walk with heads high. Kids playing safely in well-tended parks, going to schools which nurture and educate them eases my mind and uplifts my soul.

I think of Trenton, the soul of Mercer County as the center of it all. Between Washington D.C. up through Baltimore then on to Philadelphia, pulling into Newark and then the Big Apple, on up to Hartford and Providence til you hit Boston. In the middle of all that is New Jersey’s capital city, Trenton.

One day I would like to see Mercer County filled with the best Black people have to offer. Because we lie midway between New York and Philadelphia there is plenty of everything: jobs, culture, entertainment, transportation, education, vacations spots, economic opportunity, history, and the weather is getting better.

This is why we brought back The Nubian News. People make up a city. Trenton has some of the best people in the world. There is work we need to do to make it better for the few who don’t have a dream. My heart breaks for them but together they can hope too. It isn’t right to believe there is not a better life out there.

It isn’t all their fault. We must shoulder part of the blame. We must come up with solutions. I believe we will.

Every week we will talk to you and every week we want you to talk back to us. Sharing ideas, dreams, we will begin to set goals, then plan ways to find answers to problems that plague our great city

Communication is the key. If the brain can’t communicate with the legs – you won’t walk. We haven’t been able to talk with each other on a citywide level. Our mayor and other leaders don’t talk with us because they haven’t had a way to do it. Now they do.

Each week The Nubian News will give a newspaper to every home and every business in Trenton. All of us will be on the same page, getting the same information. Through these pages the mayor can talk with all of us and we will be able to answer him.

We can make everything work if we can talk with each other. Now we can talk with each other. In the weeks to come our website will become more functional and we’ll have that platform too.

We have a big job before us. But we’ve always had big jobs to do. We’ve done them before and we’ll do them again. We came out of slavery, we grew stronger even without our forty acres and a mule, we defeated jim crow, took our civil rights and we can do whatever we want to do. All we have to do is dream, devise a strategy to achieve it, pull up our sleeve and work our butts off.

Up, you mighty race, accomplish what you will. – Marcus Mosiah Garvey

Validating the Nubian Perspective