Tag Archives: racism

Presidential voting rights for veterans on Guam, territories sought

Soldier saluting

The governor, in his letter to the president, said it’s a “tragic irony” that so many from Guam laid down their lives and thousands more fought and bled on foreign shores in the service of America’s most cherished ideal of defending democracy, yet they cannot vote for their commander-in-chief, the American president.

Source: Presidential voting rights for veterans on Guam, territories sought

Political prisoner of war Robert Seth Hayes paroled after 45 years

         

(left picture) Robert Seth Hayes holds his little granddaughter Myaisha Hayes in an old photo. Imagine the joy of of reuniting in (relative) freedom with the family who have supported him over the decades.
(right picture) Uncle Baba Seth is visited by Imani Hayes, 12, Sister Yah and Valerie last November.

Amsterdam News, Aug. 9, 2018 – Having been incarcerated since 1973, original Black Panther activist Robert Seth Hayes, 69, was released on parole last Tuesday. He joins a short list of revolutionaries from the 1960s and 1970s who are now hitting New York’s streets as elderly men after spending decades in the belly of the beast, simply for fighting for their freedom.

Hayes denied participating in the June 1973 Bronx shooting death of New York Transit cop Sidney Thompson, but he was arrested, convicted and sentenced to 25 years to life nonetheless. He had been hit with “five counts of murder, attempted murder, third degree criminal possession of a weapon and multiple counts of robbery.”

Even though he has maintained a clean disciplinary prison record, has been eligible for parole since 1998 and has been in poor health in recent years, he has continuously been denied after each hearing, every two years. The Parole Board argued that “he remained a threat to society.”

After 10 failed attempts, he was finally granted parole on his 11th try, 20 years later.

Hayes was granted parole and released July 24, 2018, having met all criteria for release according to his sentence,” read a statement from the New York City Jericho Movement. “The parole commissioners recognized his progress after serving 45 years in prison and granted his parole application at his 11th parole hearing. He is looking forward to being reunited with his family and friends. We welcome him home! We spoke with Seth today, and he is grateful to all of his friends and supporters. Once he gets settled in, he plans to write a statement of his own.”

There are still more than two dozen “political prisoners of war” who remain captured behind enemy lines. Ten have died while there, since 2010. Many of the militants were in their early twenties when they joined revolutionary organizations and took up arms to combat police terrorism. They fought for Black Power, and many were framed and incarcerated, or lost their lives in the trenches while fighting.

To quote late, great one-time “prisoner in exile” Herman Ferguson, “Free ‘em all!”

This story first appeared at http://amsterdamnews.com/news/2018/aug/09/political-prisoner-war-robert-seth-hayes-paroled-a/.

Printed with permission of San Francisco Bay View and
The Amsterdam News

BAR Book Forum: Mehrsa Baradaran’s “The Color of Money” | Black Agenda Report

“And while racism has often been popularly considered as physical power and violence, the history of racial slavery in the United States demonstrates that violence and economic exploitation are often one and the same thing.”

 Banking Against (Black) Capitalism: On “The Color of Money” By Armond Towns, Carolyn Hardin

“When the Emancipation Proclamation was signed, the black community controlled about 1% of the nation’s wealth. Over 150 years later, that number hasn’t budged. The reason for this lack of economic progress despite the fact that racial progress has been made is the story I tell in my book.”

Source: BAR Book Forum: Mehrsa Baradaran’s “The Color of Money” | Black Agenda Report

Government watchdog report finds racial disparities in school discipline practices

The disproportionate discipline of African-American students has been extensively documented; yet the reasons for those disparities are less well understood. Drawing upon one year of middle-school disciplinary data for an urban school district, we explored three of the most commonly offered hypotheses for disproportionate discipline based on gender, race, and socioeconomic status. Racial and gender disparities in office referrals, suspensions, and expulsions were somewhat more robust than socioeconomic differences. Both racial and gender differences remained when controlling for socioeconomic status. Finally, although evidence emerged that boys engage more frequently in a broad range of disruptive behavior, there were no similar findings for race. Rather, there appeared to be a differential pattern of treatment, originating at the classroom level, wherein African-American students are referred to the office for infractions that are more subjective in interpretation. Implications for teacher training and structural reform are explored.” This was published 12/2002, (It’s been going on forever. The system is taking very few steps to stop it.) The Urban Review

Source: Government watchdog report finds racial disparities in school discipline practices

Editorial #3 Mayor Jackson Must Replace Police Director Parrey

Police Director Ernest J Parrey has characterized his remark calling some of the people of Trenton, “Hood Rats” as an unfortunate use of the term.
We think he got it wrong. Our take on the remark is it was demeaning and insidious not unfortunate.
We think it is very indicative of his service to the people of Trenton. He may say it has nothing to do with race but we don’t believe him. We are jaded by years of racial references and overt bigotry and we simply do not trust him at his word or words.
He says this thing then he says it’s not this thing. He expects us to believe him even though he speaks from both sides of his mouth. Years ago we would have given him the benefit of the doubt, now we believe it’s he who must understand, his words can never be undone.
Therefore we call on Mayor Jackson to replace the Police Director with someone who has never called the group of people he is there to protect and defend out of their name.
There is too much going  on in the country for us to have to worry about where this man is coming from.
Police are killing Black people. They are not held accountable for their crimes, and in seems as though Black lives don’t matter because they are Black lives.
Having a Police Director who might or might not judge people by the color of their skin instead of the worth of their being is a question mark we don’t need at this time.
The situation, the uncertainty, needs to be cleared up.
Stand up for those who put you in office Mayor Jackson. Your appointee can fend for himself.

Editorial #2 – We Need A Seat At The Table

“If you don’t have a seat at the table you are probably on the menu”.

Back in the day when we didn’t have many choices but to serve, we were told to build a table. So we built a table and some chairs. When we were done we were sent back to our place. We never sat at the table.

It was at the table where so much was decided. Our futures were decided at that table. War and peace was decided at that table. That table saw and decided the path the country would follow. But we never sat at that table. We served it. We heard everything that went on, whether we understood it or not.

But we never had a seat.

Come up to today and there are many tables where we still don’t have a seat.

Do you realize there are thousands of boards, commissions, tribunals, committees, authorities, regulatory bodies, courts, chambers etc. all over the state? Most of these we have never heard anything about. But these bodies dole out millions, nay billions of dollars every year and we don’t know what they’re doing or who they are giving money to.

One thing we know, our communities are not getting any better financially. They are spending $300 million on renovating the state house while saying they will give Trenton $18 million for various projects. Imagine if they spent that $300 million on Trenton and the $18 million on the state house how much different out city would look.

We need seats at the tables where decisions are made as to who get these public funds. I was at a New Jersey Economic Development Authority meeting a few months back. They gave out about $100 million that day. But none to any Black faces.

Sometimes there a African Americans on these Boards but I question whether they are there to represent the Black community or do they think they are there to represent the entire state. I want people who will represent and fight to get our communities and our businesses funds to improve our lot.

It doesn’t seem as though the distribution of wealth has come home to us. This has got to change. We pay our just share of taxes to the state coffers. We need to get our just share of wealth coming back to us.

At the moment, we don’t have the businesses and other structures to utilize all the funds due us. But that’s because of past injustices. The injustices have been long and painful. It has to stop.

Our plan is to sit in on every commission and board and authority and court session brought to order in New Jersey. We intend to bring together a mass of volunteers who will spread out and join in every ‘sit-down’ in the state.

We are going to have a seat at the table. It may not be an official seat but we will know what is going on and we will report back to the community who got what and for what. We’ll also say if there were people who looked like us who actually represented us or they were there for the status quo.

Enough is enough. We may get a Democrat for governor in November. If we do I want to know what he is going to do for us. We’ve supported democrats for ages and now it’s time for them to support us with the same fervor.

So if you are tired of being tired we’ll need your help to do this. We have to roll up our sleeves and dig in. We can, we must do this. The future well-being of our children and grandchildren rests with what we do now.

I’m not easy on me and I’m not going to be easy on you. We have a job to do.

Like Michael said, ‘take a look in the mirror and make a change’.

“Up you mighty race, you can accomplish what you will” Marcus Mosiah Garvey

If you hate Colin Kaepernick, you must also hate Jackie Robinson

There I was, the black grandson of a slave, the son of a black sharecropper, part of a historic occasion, a symbolic hero to my people. The air was sparkling. The sunlight was warm. The band struck up the national anthem. The flag billowed in the wind. It should have been a glorious moment for me as the stirring words of the national anthem poured from the stands. Perhaps, it was, but then again, perhaps, the anthem could be called the theme song for a drama called The Noble Experiment. Today, as I look back on that opening game of my first world series, I must tell you that it was Mr. Rickey’s drama and that I was only a principal actor. As I write this twenty years later, I cannot stand and sing the anthem. I cannot salute the flag; I know that I am a black man in a white world. In 1972, in 1947, at my birth in 1919, I know that I never had it made.

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/king-hate-colin-kaepernick-hate-jackie-robinson-article-1.2771561

The Most Racist Statue in America Is in … Pittsburgh, and It’s the Most Ridiculous Magical Negro You’ll Ever See 

There are times, like when watching footage of what happened in Charlottesville, Va., that racism bombards the senses like a virus, leaving your skin sore, your soul hardened and your spirit fatigued; a disillusioning, full-body wizening that disrupts, destroys and (occasionally) ends lives.

Source: The Most Racist Statue in America Is in … Pittsburgh, and It’s the Most Ridiculous Magical Negro You’ll Ever See 

South Korea’s first Black model faces racism in a nation where white people are ‘welcomed with open arms’

Han, 16, has a Nigerian father in a society where racial discrimination is widespread and people of mixed race are commonly referred to as “mongrels”.

“A dark-skinned fashion model like Han was unheard of in South Korea, so recruiting him was a big gamble,” said agent Youn Bum.

Now Han is posing for top glossy magazines as the country’s first black fashion model.

South Korea has for years sought to foster the image of a modern, sophisticated and tech-savvy nation whose pop culture has made waves across Asia.

But behind the facade of an economic and cultural powerhouse lies a deeply rooted racism – even as its immigrant population creeps up, doubling over the last decade but still only four per cent of the population.

Source: South Korea’s first black model faces racism in a nation where white people are ‘welcomed with open arms’