Tag Archives: Just For Fun

Which One Is the Big Joker? A Black Supreme Court Ruling

It is the opinion of this court that, for reasons of clarity and by every metric of common sense, the big joker should be the bigger joker. We do, however, acknowledge the precedent of house rules.

 Our ruling:

By a 5-4 margin, the court rules in favor of the plaintiff.

However, we also rule that J-Mac’s slur that referred to his opponents as “cheating motherfuckers” no longer applies, as this was a legitimate dispute. As such, he must compensate Man Man with the fifth of Crown Royal that spilled when J-Mac knocked over the spades table.

Source: Which One Is the Big Joker? A Black Supreme Court Ruling

Chuck Berry Took His ‘Ding-a-Ling’ to No. 1: Rewinding the Charts, 1972 | Billboard

The rock‘n’roll legend’s only Billboard Hot 100 chart-topper was a bawdy novelty song that, unlike his other hits, he didn’t write.

Source: Chuck Berry Took His ‘Ding-a-Ling’ to No. 1: Rewinding the Charts, 1972 | Billboard

New African literature is disrupting what Western presses prize

There is a thriving counter-current of transnational African literary life that confounds rather than caters to an international taste for “digestible” fiction.

African literature is the object of immense international interest across both academic and popular registers. Far from the field’s earlier, post-colonial association with marginality, a handful of star “Afropolitan” names are at the forefront of global trade publishing.

Books like Chimamanda Adichie’s “Americanah” and “Half of a Yellow Sun”, Teju Cole’s “Open City”, Taiye Selasi’s “Ghana Must Go” and Yaa Gyasi’s “Homegoing” have confounded neat divisions between Western and African literary traditions. The Cameroonian novelist Imbolo Mbue captured a million-dollar contract for her first book, “Behold the Dreamers”. That’s even before it joined the Oprah’s Book Club pantheon this year.

Source: New African literature is disrupting what Western presses prize

Editorial #1Why Did We Come Back?

September 8, 2017 - This editorial marks the return of The Nubian News after eleven years.

An African proverb says, “Dreams are voices of ancestors.”

King said, “I have a dream.”

Oscar Hammerstein saidYou gotta have a dream. If you don’t have a dream, how you gonna make a dream come true?

Nigerian proverb: “If I tell you my dream, you might forget it. If I act on my dream, perhaps you will remember it, but if I involve you, it becomes your dream too.”

My dream is that one day we will all be free. My grandchildren will never have to debate whether someone hates them or is holding them hostage because of the color of their skin.

I dream that one day Trenton, this city I love so much, will look and function as the Black Mecca.

As I walk this city I see gleaming streets of gold and houses and homes, beautiful beyond words, with warmth of love and prosperity in every window.

I see people who have thrown off the yolk of pain, loneliness and despair and walk with heads high. Kids playing safely in well-tended parks, going to schools which nurture and educate them eases my mind and uplifts my soul.

I think of Trenton, the soul of Mercer County as the center of it all. Between Washington D.C. up through Baltimore then on to Philadelphia, pulling into Newark and then the Big Apple, on up to Hartford and Providence til you hit Boston. In the middle of all that is New Jersey’s capital city, Trenton.

One day I would like to see Mercer County filled with the best Black people have to offer. Because we lie midway between New York and Philadelphia there is plenty of everything: jobs, culture, entertainment, transportation, education, vacations spots, economic opportunity, history, and the weather is getting better.

This is why we brought back The Nubian News. People make up a city. Trenton has some of the best people in the world. There is work we need to do to make it better for the few who don’t have a dream. My heart breaks for them but together they can hope too. It isn’t right to believe there is not a better life out there.

It isn’t all their fault. We must shoulder part of the blame. We must come up with solutions. I believe we will.

Every week we will talk to you and every week we want you to talk back to us. Sharing ideas, dreams, we will begin to set goals, then plan ways to find answers to problems that plague our great city

Communication is the key. If the brain can’t communicate with the legs – you won’t walk. We haven’t been able to talk with each other on a citywide level. Our mayor and other leaders don’t talk with us because they haven’t had a way to do it. Now they do.

Each week The Nubian News will give a newspaper to every home and every business in Trenton. All of us will be on the same page, getting the same information. Through these pages the mayor can talk with all of us and we will be able to answer him.

We can make everything work if we can talk with each other. Now we can talk with each other. In the weeks to come our website will become more functional and we’ll have that platform too.

We have a big job before us. But we’ve always had big jobs to do. We’ve done them before and we’ll do them again. We came out of slavery, we grew stronger even without our forty acres and a mule, we defeated jim crow, took our civil rights and we can do whatever we want to do. All we have to do is dream, devise a strategy to achieve it, pull up our sleeve and work our butts off.

Up, you mighty race, accomplish what you will. – Marcus Mosiah Garvey

The Amazing Power Of African Beads

African Beads are often seen as just a decorative item of jewellery, but the meaning and history of our African beads goes back many hundreds of years with complex uses that have evolved with the modern world. At first glance, the beads so commonly used in African culture are used for fashion, and you can find leg beads, ankle beads, neck beads, and waist beads. In Africa’s history, the beads have had numerous uses, from protection from illness, as a sign of maturity and menstruation for daughters as they come of age, or as a sign of important ancestry and family. African beads were also an important part of a marriage dowry, as woman would wear multiple beads and the only person allowed to remove them was the husband at night.

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Naomi Osaka: 19-Yr-Old Haitian-Japanese Tennis Star Defeats U.S. Open Champion

Source: Naomi Osaka: 19-Yr-Old Haitian-Japanese Tennis Star Defeats U.S. Open Champion

Floyd Mayweather Jr.: I’ve Paid the IRS $26,000,000

 

Floyd “Money” Mayweather wants to make it clear that he isn’t ducking paying his taxes. In fact, the undefeated fighter, who is set to take on the Great White Hope in August, claims that he paid the IRS $26 million in 2015.

Source: Floyd Mayweather Jr.: I’ve Paid the IRS $26,000,000

The Chitlin Circuit – An electrifying Jimi Hendrix plays guitar and Ike and Tina Turner give a spellbinding show

 

A young Jimi Hendrix on the Chitlin Circuit

The “Chitlin Circuit” is the collective name given to performance venues throughout the eastern, southern, and upper midwest areas of the United States that were safe and acceptable for African American musicians, comedians, and other entertainers to perform in during the era of racial segregation in the United States …

Source: An electrifying Jimi Hendrix plays guitar and Ike and Tina Turner give a spellbinding show in these fascinating photos of the swinging Chitlin Circuit in segregated America

Meet The 9 Stunningly Beautiful Black Women From Brazil!!

Source: Meet The 9 Stunningly Beautiful Black Women From Brazil!! –