Tag Archives: entertainment

January 11, 2019 Edition of The Nubian News

The complete online edition of the January 11, 2019 edition of The Nubian News

Rep. Watson Coleman Nominated To Appropriations Committee

Washington, DC — As she begins her third term in the House of Representatives, Congresswoman Bonnie Watson Coleman (D-NJ) has been nominated by the Democratic Steering Committee to serve on the House Appropriations Committee, one of the most powerful committees in the House, responsible for setting funding levels for federal departments and agencies.

Famous Blacks Who Died in 2018

Kofi Annan – Ghanaian diplomat who served as the seventh Secretary-General of the United Nations from January 1997 to December 2006. Annan and the UN were the co-recipients of the 2001 Nobel Peace Prize.
Ethel Ayler – Starred on The Cosby Show as Carrie Hanks, [Clair] Huxtable’s mother.
Lerone Bennett – Scholar, author, social historian and activist. His best-known works include “Before the Mayflower” (1962) and “Forced into Glory” (2000). Was the longtime editor for Ebony and Jet.

FIESTAS DE LA VIRGEN DE LA NUBE

TRENTON-La fiesta de la Virgen de la Nube contó con la participación de centenares de compatriotas ecuatorianos que llenaron el graderío del colorido coliseo en el Norte de Trenton. Hubo de todo un poco. Grupos de baile de Trenton y Hightstown, artistas invitados, bandas del pueblo del Señor de Girón, grupo de flores de Trenton y hasta un ladrón que robó mis tarjetas de crédito e identificaciones personales, cuando recargaba la batería del celular a un lado, mientras servía en calidad de juez en el certamen de belleza, que se llevó a cabo el martes 1 de enero 2019.

Remembering the Mind-Body Connection for Diabetes

Recent findings from the National Institute of Health indicate that diagnoses of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes among youth are on the rise. A debilitating illness, diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, and last year cost the nation about $327 billion in treatments and lost productivity, according to the American Diabetes Association. Much like with mental illness, the prevalence of diabetes is increasing, and scientists are paying greater attention to the links between physical and mental health.

The complete online edition of the January 11, 2019 edition of The Nubian News.

Nancy Wilson Interview

by Darnell Meyers-Johnson

This is a re-print of an interview The Nubian News published in 1990.

It was 10:00 AM in San Diego, California. Nancy Wilson had agreed to an interview with this reporter regarding her 30th anniversary as a recording artist. and her new album A LADY WITH A SONG.
It was 1 :00 PM here in Trenton and time to call her. I was very nervous. What should I say to this musical legend who’s been singing professionally for nearly 40 years? What should I say to this woman the critics have called a timeless, passionate class act? As I dialed the numbers that would connect me with her voice, I could only think of my sweaty palms and quivering fingers on the phone. My prepared outline of questions became useless as my professional demeanor took a back seat to my school boy anxiousness.
Before I realized what was happening, it was too late. ‘Hello,” the voice said. It was Nancy Wilson. As she went to get her other phone, I picked up my outline from the floor and proceeded to give the interview.
The Nancy Wilson legacy began in Columbus, Ohio where she started singing professionally at age 15. At that time, Wilson had her own local TV show, ‘SKYLINE MELODY.’ Her interest in music actually began at age 4 when her father provided early exposure to many vocalists like Ruth Brown, LaVerne Baker, Nat King Cole, Billy Eckstine and Louis Jordan. However, Wilson’s main influence may have been a male singer with Lionel Hampton’s band named Little Jimmy Scott. Wilson explained, ‘I sound most like him. That’s where I get my (vocal} nuances from.
In 1956 Wilson left college where she was studying to become a teacher, to join the Rusty Bryant Band. That same year she met the late Julian ‘Cannonball’ Adderley who would later assist in launching her career. In 1959 Wilson moved to New York City to start a career. ‘I knew exactly what I wanted to work for. I didn’t go to New York looking for fame.
What Wilson was looking for was Adderley’s manager, John Levy and a deal that would bring her to Capitol Records. Wilson said the main reason was simple. ‘They cared about people. Capitol cared about their artists. At that time they had Nat King Cole, Frank Sinatra, Peggy Lee. These people were all established.
Wilson received her first big break when she was asked to fill in permanently for Irene Reid in a New York nightclub. One night John Levy visited the club and heard Wilson sing ‘Guess Who I Saw Today? which had become part of her repertoire since high school. ‘That was the song that got me my manager and my label’, she said.
The label, of course, was Capitol. When the first album ‘LIKE IN LOVE’ was released in 1960, critics quickly labeled her the next Ella Fitzgerald. Wilson admitted that the label ‘bothered me because that woman was out there doing it and still is. It discredited both of us, but now I’ve established my own style.’
Indeed she has. Her 20 year association with Capitol produced many hits including ‘I Was Telling Him About You,” ‘Face It Girl, It’s Over,” ‘Days of Wine and Roses,” and ‘How Glad I Am’ which won her a Grammy in 1964.
Nevertheless, even today, labeling still bothers Nancy Wilson. Especially when she is referred to as a jazz artist. According to Wilson, ‘You could call me anything, I guess. But I was never really a jazz performer or a jazz singer. People just gave me that title.’ When asked how she would describe herself professionally, Wilson quickly obliged by saying ‘I’m a singer who sings good songs.’ She went on to explain how she selects a good song.
‘Lyrics are the most important thing, The song has to have a message or a story and not just rely on a beat. Even if the song isn’t perfect there must be a structure there to work on.
This brings us to Wilson’s latest collection of good songs entitled ‘A LADY WITH A SONG.’ This is Wilson’s 6th album tor Columbia Records and her 52nd overall. Wilson is very proud of the album and called it an accumulation of the 38 years I have been singing. ‘A LADY WITH A SONG is me, all the years and laughter, tears and love.’
Highlighting the album are several superb tracks including ‘Do You Still Dream About Me” which Wilson said is the most similar to her earlier hits. Also included is a remake of the Emotions’ classic hit ‘Don’t Ask My Neighbors featuring the group on background vocals
Although the new album has more of an R&B feel to it than her early work, Wilson said that it’s not much different from her more recent recordings. ‘The object of the game with this album was to get the 10 or 12 best songs we could,’ she added.
There are two tracks on the album that put her in a different realm of recording. One was the title cut •A Lady With A Song.• ‘It was the first time I was so personally involved in a song. It was written tor and about me by Ken Hirsch and Lorrin Smokey Bates.’
The recording session for the gospel inspired ‘Heavens Hands” which features an all star choir including Natalie Cole, Deniece Williams, Howard Hewett, Siedah Garrett and Teena Marie among others, was a different experience for Wilson. She said she had never really performed gospel before. She credits Phillip Bailey of Earth Wind and Fire for organizing the star studded choir.
‘Phillip was a great help on the whole album. He’s the one who called people up and told them we needed a choir. It was wonderful. Just having so many people show up for the session.’
Although ‘A LADY WITH A SONG’ was just released, Wilson said she’s planning on going back into the studio in the fall. She said that she’s planning on coming out with a new album every year so that she can ‘leave people with a complete body of work when I’m gone.’
Throughout the interview Ms. Wilson remained polite and pleasant. But her manner slightly changed when asked to compare the new album to those she did in the 60s. ‘I will not do that,’ she said. ‘I will not compare this album to those of the past because those songs are important to people. People got married to those songs. They were a part of people’s lives. It wouldn’t be fair to say this album is better because the times were different then.’
And Wilson is just as interested in discussing the future as she is in preserving the past. Immediate plans include a late night syndicated television show called ‘RED HOT AND COOL’ which will feature live performances by jazz artists. Her last television series, NBC’s ‘THE NANCY WILSON SHOW,’ earned her an Emmy Award in 1968. Wilson also said to expect her return as Olivia’s grandmother on ‘THE COSBY SHOW.’ In reference to concert dates, Wilson said that she performs every year at New York’s Carnegie Hall, but as of right now, no east coast dates have been confirmed.
Well, half an hour had passed since our conversation began. As I was about to say goodbye, Ms. Wilson said that she was looking forward to meeting at one of her east coast engagements. I was surprised, though she seemed sincere, and I started to get nervous again. She gave me her road manager’s name and told me to ask for him when she comes to this area. I managed to get out a very polite “I will, thanks.” And before I knew it the conversation ended as quickly as it began.

The Wire, 10 years on: ‘We tore the cover off a city and showed the American dream was dead’

Exactly 10 years after its final episode aired, The Wire is established as one of the greatest shows in the history of US television – some would say the greatest. But, while shows such as The Sopranos and Mad Men launched with loud fanfares and walked paths strewn with accolades, strong ratings and Emmy awards, The Wire’s route to the pantheon was a long slog. “David Simon had to fight for every season,” says Clarke Peters (Det Lester Freamon). “Nothing was ever guaranteed.”

Source: The Wire, 10 years on: ‘We tore the cover off a city and showed the American dream was dead’ | Television & radio | The Guardian

Aretha Franklin: A Divine Gift for us and through us to all humanity

This is an official statement from the Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan on the passing of legendary singer and activist Aretha Franklin, who departed this life on August 16, 2018 at her home in Detroit.

It is with great pain and sorrow that we reflect on and mourn the loss of this magnificent woman of extreme value. Her value is not only the beautiful gift of her voice, but also the sweetness of her soul, and the deep sensitivity that was her gift, to feel the hurt and pain throughout the world.

Aretha_Franklin_08-28-2018.jpg

Source: Aretha Franklin: A Divine Gift for us and through us to all humanity

Huge air show blasts into Atlantic City Wednesday, August 22

This show is big and there’s hardly a place in Atlantic City along the beach that won’t give you a great view of the planes screaming overhead. The beaches and boardwalk are likely to be jam-packed with people.

 

Source: Huge air show blasts into Atlantic City this week. Here’s what you need to know | NJ.com

Which One Is the Big Joker? A Black Supreme Court Ruling

It is the opinion of this court that, for reasons of clarity and by every metric of common sense, the big joker should be the bigger joker. We do, however, acknowledge the precedent of house rules.

 Our ruling:

By a 5-4 margin, the court rules in favor of the plaintiff.

However, we also rule that J-Mac’s slur that referred to his opponents as “cheating motherfuckers” no longer applies, as this was a legitimate dispute. As such, he must compensate Man Man with the fifth of Crown Royal that spilled when J-Mac knocked over the spades table.

Source: Which One Is the Big Joker? A Black Supreme Court Ruling

Alexandra Burke and the trouble with reality TV and race | Television & radio | The Guardian

In a damning piece for Black Ballad, its editor, Tobi Oredein, described how this series of Strictly had once again seen flawed and damaging stereotypes foisted on a black reality TV contestant. “The ‘problem’ the public has with Alexandra Burke exposes the hypocrisy and racism that still has tight grip around the neck of the British nation,” she said.

Oredein said the treatment of Burke was indicative of how some members of the British public remained uncomfortable with a black woman outperforming the white contestants. “Alexandra is a self-assured black woman who is infiltrating a world of entertainment that is seen as an extremely white space,” she added.

“To the British public, how can this black woman be better than her white counterparts, show emotion and be beautiful?”

Source: Alexandra Burke and the trouble with reality TV and race |The Guardian

New African literature is disrupting what Western presses prize

There is a thriving counter-current of transnational African literary life that confounds rather than caters to an international taste for “digestible” fiction.

African literature is the object of immense international interest across both academic and popular registers. Far from the field’s earlier, post-colonial association with marginality, a handful of star “Afropolitan” names are at the forefront of global trade publishing.

Books like Chimamanda Adichie’s “Americanah” and “Half of a Yellow Sun”, Teju Cole’s “Open City”, Taiye Selasi’s “Ghana Must Go” and Yaa Gyasi’s “Homegoing” have confounded neat divisions between Western and African literary traditions. The Cameroonian novelist Imbolo Mbue captured a million-dollar contract for her first book, “Behold the Dreamers”. That’s even before it joined the Oprah’s Book Club pantheon this year.

Source: New African literature is disrupting what Western presses prize

South Korea’s first Black model faces racism in a nation where white people are ‘welcomed with open arms’

Han, 16, has a Nigerian father in a society where racial discrimination is widespread and people of mixed race are commonly referred to as “mongrels”.

“A dark-skinned fashion model like Han was unheard of in South Korea, so recruiting him was a big gamble,” said agent Youn Bum.

Now Han is posing for top glossy magazines as the country’s first black fashion model.

South Korea has for years sought to foster the image of a modern, sophisticated and tech-savvy nation whose pop culture has made waves across Asia.

But behind the facade of an economic and cultural powerhouse lies a deeply rooted racism – even as its immigrant population creeps up, doubling over the last decade but still only four per cent of the population.

Source: South Korea’s first black model faces racism in a nation where white people are ‘welcomed with open arms’ 

Floyd Mayweather Jr.: I’ve Paid the IRS $26,000,000

 

Floyd “Money” Mayweather wants to make it clear that he isn’t ducking paying his taxes. In fact, the undefeated fighter, who is set to take on the Great White Hope in August, claims that he paid the IRS $26 million in 2015.

Source: Floyd Mayweather Jr.: I’ve Paid the IRS $26,000,000