Tag Archives: Dr Francis Cress-Welsing

This is the April 20th Edition of The Nubian News. In this issue we delve into the city council candidates. May 8th is the City election. Trentonians will elect three council people at-large and four ward representatives. This is an extremely important election for Trenton. TNN has kept a close eye on the candidates. Some of the candidates have taken a wide berth around The Nubian News. They haven’t responded to our questionnaires and have spent none of their advertising money with us. There are few Black businesses which deal in advertising. If they are not spending their ad dollars with TNN they probably are not spending those dollars with Black businesses. However in our last issue before the election we will look into their spending and report back to the community. If these candidates do not invest in our community they don’t deserve our vote.

Link to the online edition of the April 20, 2018 The Nubian News

Government watchdog report finds racial disparities in school discipline practices

The disproportionate discipline of African-American students has been extensively documented; yet the reasons for those disparities are less well understood. Drawing upon one year of middle-school disciplinary data for an urban school district, we explored three of the most commonly offered hypotheses for disproportionate discipline based on gender, race, and socioeconomic status. Racial and gender disparities in office referrals, suspensions, and expulsions were somewhat more robust than socioeconomic differences. Both racial and gender differences remained when controlling for socioeconomic status. Finally, although evidence emerged that boys engage more frequently in a broad range of disruptive behavior, there were no similar findings for race. Rather, there appeared to be a differential pattern of treatment, originating at the classroom level, wherein African-American students are referred to the office for infractions that are more subjective in interpretation. Implications for teacher training and structural reform are explored.” This was published 12/2002, (It’s been going on forever. The system is taking very few steps to stop it.) The Urban Review

Source: Government watchdog report finds racial disparities in school discipline practices

New African literature is disrupting what Western presses prize

There is a thriving counter-current of transnational African literary life that confounds rather than caters to an international taste for “digestible” fiction.

African literature is the object of immense international interest across both academic and popular registers. Far from the field’s earlier, post-colonial association with marginality, a handful of star “Afropolitan” names are at the forefront of global trade publishing.

Books like Chimamanda Adichie’s “Americanah” and “Half of a Yellow Sun”, Teju Cole’s “Open City”, Taiye Selasi’s “Ghana Must Go” and Yaa Gyasi’s “Homegoing” have confounded neat divisions between Western and African literary traditions. The Cameroonian novelist Imbolo Mbue captured a million-dollar contract for her first book, “Behold the Dreamers”. That’s even before it joined the Oprah’s Book Club pantheon this year.

Source: New African literature is disrupting what Western presses prize

If you hate Colin Kaepernick, you must also hate Jackie Robinson

There I was, the black grandson of a slave, the son of a black sharecropper, part of a historic occasion, a symbolic hero to my people. The air was sparkling. The sunlight was warm. The band struck up the national anthem. The flag billowed in the wind. It should have been a glorious moment for me as the stirring words of the national anthem poured from the stands. Perhaps, it was, but then again, perhaps, the anthem could be called the theme song for a drama called The Noble Experiment. Today, as I look back on that opening game of my first world series, I must tell you that it was Mr. Rickey’s drama and that I was only a principal actor. As I write this twenty years later, I cannot stand and sing the anthem. I cannot salute the flag; I know that I am a black man in a white world. In 1972, in 1947, at my birth in 1919, I know that I never had it made.

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/king-hate-colin-kaepernick-hate-jackie-robinson-article-1.2771561

Trenton Street Funeral with Rev Mark A Broach

“This is what sick and tired looks like”

Stop the Killing of Our Young Men

On Friday there was a funeral march in Trenton. A march of mothers and father who have lost their sons senselessly by street crimes. Murders.

Rev Mark A. Broach, Pastor of the Trenton Deliverance Center, founded the Trenton Street Funeral organization. This organization brings together loved ones of those who are killed on our streets.

 

They are brought together to “give the family of victims a chance to express themselves”.

Rev Broach said, “ Trenton has had so many funerals that the community doesn’t get a chance to know what the families are going through. We’re giving them a chance to tell the community what they are going through.”

And tell they did. With a coffin, flowers, pallbearers, grieving mothers and a supportive community. About 200 people gathered at the Trenton War Memorial at five points. People who were saying “this is what sick and tired looks like”. (Go to www.thenubiannews.com for video of the funeral march.)

There are more than 180 unsolved murders in Trenton over the past 25 years. Trenton Street has approached Mayor Jackson with its concerns but it seems “his focus is off” on other things.

Next week Trenton Street Funeral will put their demand in writing to submit to the city council, the mayor and the county prosecutor’s office.

“We want to see change, we want to see things different. And the only way that we feel we can do that is if we go directly to the source. So we are going to be demanding change.”

For video of the March go to: www.thenubiannews.com

Community leaders demand removal of Central park monument honoring racist doctor

At a time when neo-Nazis, white nationalists and hateful right-wing extremists run rampant throughout the country with impunity, we must send a definitive message that the despicable acts of J. Marion Sims are repugnant and reprehensible,” Mark-Viverito said. “J. Marion Sims conducted horrific, painful, medical atrocities on non-anesthetized enslaved Black women with free rein.”

What is not in dispute is that between 1845 and 1849, in a makeshift hospital he built in his backyard, Sims inaugurated a long, drawn-out series of excruciating, experimental gynecological operations on countless enslaved African women. This was all done without the benefit of anesthesia or before any type of antiseptic was used. Many lost their lives to infection. It is their story that history has failed to tell and their legacy of courage and endurance that should be honored, not their captor’s. … Source

 

Source: Elected officials, community leaders demand removal of Central park monument honoring controversial doctor

The Most Racist Statue in America Is in … Pittsburgh, and It’s the Most Ridiculous Magical Negro You’ll Ever See 

There are times, like when watching footage of what happened in Charlottesville, Va., that racism bombards the senses like a virus, leaving your skin sore, your soul hardened and your spirit fatigued; a disillusioning, full-body wizening that disrupts, destroys and (occasionally) ends lives.

Source: The Most Racist Statue in America Is in … Pittsburgh, and It’s the Most Ridiculous Magical Negro You’ll Ever See 

Mother of Philando Castile Speaks Out Against Not Guilty Verdict

People talk about Trenton street violence, that ain’t nothing compared to the violence of police shooting a man down in the street for nothing and the entire weight of the ‘justice, legal system’ standing in support of him. This systemic violence against people of color worldwide is the fight of The Nubian News. We must replace the system of white supremacy/racism with a system of justice.

STILL I RISE | dalitnationdotcom

I was in the fifth grade when I learnt I was a Dalit. I had been reading up on the Bhopal Gas Tragedy and how it had affected this large group of people called Untouchables. As I began to read more about them, about their ‘spiritual pollution’, a feeling of dread came over me. I felt this had to do with me somehow and I ran to my mother to ask her what she knew. The conflicted look on her face made it clear that this was a conversation she’d been dreading. Over the next couple of hours, she told me the truth about who we really were.

 

Source: STILL I RISE | dalitnationdotcom