Category Archives: Racism

In Tulsa, a century-old race massacre still haunts Black Wall Street

Olivia Hooker was 6 years old in 1921 — the year she witnessed the massacre. (Family photo)

Olivia Hooker, 103, poses at her White Plains home. Hooker is one of the last surviving witnesses of the Tulsa Race Massacre. (Michael Noble Jr. for The Washington Post

B.C. Franklin, a Greenwood lawyer and the father of famed historian John Hope Franklin, wrote a rare firsthand account of the massacre later donated to the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

“The sidewalk was literally covered with burning turpentine balls,” he wrote. “For fully forty-eight hours, the fires raged and burned everything in its path and it left nothing but ashes and burned safes and trunks and the like that were stored in beautiful houses and businesses.”

On June 1, 1921, martial law was declared. Troops rounded up black men, women and children and detained them for days.

Source: In Tulsa, a century-old race massacre still haunts Black Wall Street – The Washington Post

Israel Argues It Can Annex Any Land, Defy Any International Law

Indeed, it is an open secret that Israel is set to completely annex the occupied West Bank. In July, UN official Michael Lynk warned:

After years of creeping Israeli de facto annexation of large swathes of the West Bank through settlement expansion, the creation of closed military zones and other measures, Israel appears to be getting closer to enacting legislation that will formally annex parts of the West Bank.”

Since Lynk’s warning, several bills seeking to essentially annex the West Bank have been introduced in the Israeli Knesset, such as a controversial bill that would allow Israeli Jewish citizens to purchase Palestinian land in “Area C” of the occupied West Bank, paving the way for its eventual incorporation into Israeli territory. Area C accounts for more than 60 percent of the West Bank’s total territory.

Source: Israel Argues It Can Annex Any Land, Defy Any International Law

How a racist hate-monger formed America’s War on Drugs

From the beginning, Anslinger conflated drug use, race, and music. “Reefer makes darkies think they’re as good as white men,” he was quoted as saying. “There are 100,000 total marijuana smokers in the U.S., and most are Negroes, Hispanics, Filipinos and entertainers. Their Satanic music, jazz and swing result from marijuana use. This marijuana causes white women to seek sexual relations with Negroes, entertainers and any others.”

Source: How a racist hate-monger formed America’s War on Drugs

The Wire, 10 years on: ‘We tore the cover off a city and showed the American dream was dead’

Exactly 10 years after its final episode aired, The Wire is established as one of the greatest shows in the history of US television – some would say the greatest. But, while shows such as The Sopranos and Mad Men launched with loud fanfares and walked paths strewn with accolades, strong ratings and Emmy awards, The Wire’s route to the pantheon was a long slog. “David Simon had to fight for every season,” says Clarke Peters (Det Lester Freamon). “Nothing was ever guaranteed.”

Source: The Wire, 10 years on: ‘We tore the cover off a city and showed the American dream was dead’ | Television & radio | The Guardian

Helping Your Child To Navigate A Racist World

You may question, how do I protect my children and keep them aware at the same time? You do this by infusing their life with culture, giving them a strong sense of self, teaching them about how strong our people are, and by teaching them to be proud of every inch of who they are. Show them positive Black images in books, Black people who are accomplishing great things, take them to African-American museums and talk about what you saw, and then tell them why they are great too. You have to build up their positive sense of self because there will be plenty of people in this world who will try to tear them down. They cannot do that if you have built a strong foundation.

Source: Helping Your Child To Navigate A Racist World

Their Last Fight: Filipino Veterans Make A Final Push For Recognition

Maximo Purisima Young, 97, displays photographs from his military service. He helped transport supplies and troops in World War II, then fought as a guerilla alongside American soldiers.  DORIAN MERINA / AMERICAN HOMEFRONT

During World War II, more than a quarter million Filipinos fought alongside American soldiers. Many are still awaiting the recognition promised to them.

The toll was high: more than a million Filipinos died.

The Manila American Cemetery holds the largest number of World War II veteran graves outside the US — more than 17,000. It’s also home to a memorial to those lost or missing in action in the war which includes over 3,700 Filipinos.
CREDIT DORIAN MERINA / AMERICAN HOMEFRONT

Roosevelt signed a presidential order in 1941 bringing all military forces in the Philippines under U.S. control. But after the war, in 1946, the U.S. Congress passed legislation that stripped recognition from Filipino soldiers. It was called the Rescission Act, and it explicitly barred “rights, privileges, or benefits” from most Filipinos who fought. That same year, the Philippines became an independent nation.

Source: WUNC 91.5 North Carloina Public Radio

Political prisoner of war Robert Seth Hayes paroled after 45 years

         

(left picture) Robert Seth Hayes holds his little granddaughter Myaisha Hayes in an old photo. Imagine the joy of of reuniting in (relative) freedom with the family who have supported him over the decades.
(right picture) Uncle Baba Seth is visited by Imani Hayes, 12, Sister Yah and Valerie last November.

Amsterdam News, Aug. 9, 2018 – Having been incarcerated since 1973, original Black Panther activist Robert Seth Hayes, 69, was released on parole last Tuesday. He joins a short list of revolutionaries from the 1960s and 1970s who are now hitting New York’s streets as elderly men after spending decades in the belly of the beast, simply for fighting for their freedom.

Hayes denied participating in the June 1973 Bronx shooting death of New York Transit cop Sidney Thompson, but he was arrested, convicted and sentenced to 25 years to life nonetheless. He had been hit with “five counts of murder, attempted murder, third degree criminal possession of a weapon and multiple counts of robbery.”

Even though he has maintained a clean disciplinary prison record, has been eligible for parole since 1998 and has been in poor health in recent years, he has continuously been denied after each hearing, every two years. The Parole Board argued that “he remained a threat to society.”

After 10 failed attempts, he was finally granted parole on his 11th try, 20 years later.

Hayes was granted parole and released July 24, 2018, having met all criteria for release according to his sentence,” read a statement from the New York City Jericho Movement. “The parole commissioners recognized his progress after serving 45 years in prison and granted his parole application at his 11th parole hearing. He is looking forward to being reunited with his family and friends. We welcome him home! We spoke with Seth today, and he is grateful to all of his friends and supporters. Once he gets settled in, he plans to write a statement of his own.”

There are still more than two dozen “political prisoners of war” who remain captured behind enemy lines. Ten have died while there, since 2010. Many of the militants were in their early twenties when they joined revolutionary organizations and took up arms to combat police terrorism. They fought for Black Power, and many were framed and incarcerated, or lost their lives in the trenches while fighting.

To quote late, great one-time “prisoner in exile” Herman Ferguson, “Free ‘em all!”

This story first appeared at http://amsterdamnews.com/news/2018/aug/09/political-prisoner-war-robert-seth-hayes-paroled-a/.

Printed with permission of San Francisco Bay View and
The Amsterdam News

BAR Book Forum: Mehrsa Baradaran’s “The Color of Money” | Black Agenda Report

“And while racism has often been popularly considered as physical power and violence, the history of racial slavery in the United States demonstrates that violence and economic exploitation are often one and the same thing.”

 Banking Against (Black) Capitalism: On “The Color of Money” By Armond Towns, Carolyn Hardin

“When the Emancipation Proclamation was signed, the black community controlled about 1% of the nation’s wealth. Over 150 years later, that number hasn’t budged. The reason for this lack of economic progress despite the fact that racial progress has been made is the story I tell in my book.”

Source: BAR Book Forum: Mehrsa Baradaran’s “The Color of Money” | Black Agenda Report

Black-White Wage Gap Grows as Americans Remain in Denial

The wage gap between blacks and whites is the worst it’s been in nearly four decades, according to a new report from the Economic Policy Institute.

Last year, the hourly pay gap between blacks and whites widened to 26.7%, with whites making an average of $25.22 an hour compared to $18.49 for blacks, the EPI found. Almost 40 years ago, in 1979, the wage gap between blacks and whites was 18.1%, with whites earning an inflation-adjusted average of $19.62 an hour and blacks earning $16.07 an hour.

 What’s driving the wage gap has little to do with access to education, disparities in work experience or where someone lives, EPI found. Rather, the researchers found “discrimination…and growing earnings inequality in general,” to be the primary factors at play.

“Race is not a skill or characteristic that should have any market value as it relates to your wages, but it does,” said Valerie Wilson, the director of the program on Race, Ethnicity and the Economy at the EPI and a co-author of the report. (CNN)

Source: Black-White Wage Gap Grows as Americans Remain in Denial – Pacific Standard

Black women must work 7 months to get paid on the same level as white men

Government watchdog report finds racial disparities in school discipline practices

The disproportionate discipline of African-American students has been extensively documented; yet the reasons for those disparities are less well understood. Drawing upon one year of middle-school disciplinary data for an urban school district, we explored three of the most commonly offered hypotheses for disproportionate discipline based on gender, race, and socioeconomic status. Racial and gender disparities in office referrals, suspensions, and expulsions were somewhat more robust than socioeconomic differences. Both racial and gender differences remained when controlling for socioeconomic status. Finally, although evidence emerged that boys engage more frequently in a broad range of disruptive behavior, there were no similar findings for race. Rather, there appeared to be a differential pattern of treatment, originating at the classroom level, wherein African-American students are referred to the office for infractions that are more subjective in interpretation. Implications for teacher training and structural reform are explored.” This was published 12/2002, (It’s been going on forever. The system is taking very few steps to stop it.) The Urban Review

Source: Government watchdog report finds racial disparities in school discipline practices