February 1, 2019 Edition of The Nubian News

See the complete online edition of the February 1, 2019

In Honor of Dr. King – Let Us Vote NJ

by Al Alatunji
In honor of the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and so many others who fought and died for Blacks and all citizens to be able to participate in the electoral process, it is time for the New Jersey legislature to remove any and all barriers to the voting booth.
The sad truth is that, for many, voting can feel like an inconvenience. New Jerseyans are busy people. Often, New Jerseyans, like most voters, are asked to balance many obligations at once. Election day often requires voters to make themselves available on a specific day at a certain time. That could be very difficult if one works out of town, does shift work, or is commuting to New York or Philadelphia. State legislators need to get to work to make sure that the people of New Jersey who can vote have a more flexible process to exercise their right to vote.

The Black Church and Health Promotion

Black churches and health promotion could be effective in preventative health through community outreach. Black churches know the needs of the congregation and the community best and have their trust. There is a high incidence of high blood pressure, diabetes, stroke and heart disease in the African American population. Several studies have found that the church can be an important conduit through which to inform racial/ethnic minorities about preventive health care. Partnership between faith and health alliances are encouraged. Collaboration with health agencies to provide culturally sensitive services for African Americans and clergy is essential.

Story of Handy Brittingham/Britman

Submitted by Ira Brittingham
Corporal Handy Brittingham/Britman, (1838-1911) Emancipated Slave, Civil War Soldier, Farmer
Handy Brittingham/Britman was born into slavery in (1838-40)Worcester County Maryland, near Berlin. His mother’s name was Liddy Brittingham according to his death certificate, and his father is listed as Edward Duncan. Handy was emancipated from slavery by his owner Ephraim W. Brittingham upon the condition that he be enlisted into the United States Colored Troops, Ninth Regiment Infantry Company G. Maryland Volunteers, on November 18th, 1863. This information is contained in his deed of manumission on file at the Worcester County Courthouse in Snow Hill, Maryland. Handy’s owner was paid $300 for his enlistment, and two other slaves he enlisted at the same time in Berlin Md.

Before Rosa, Martin, Malcolm and Barack there was Jackie

by Al Alatunji
Before Rosa Parks stood up for justice and equality by demanding that she remain seated; before Dr. Rev. Martin Luther King had his dream of the Beloved Community; before Malcolm X indicted white racist America in the harshest terms for its crimes against Blacks and humanity; and before President Barack Obama walked into his office to sit behind his desk in the Oval Office of the White House and declared “Yes we can, yes we can,” Jackie Roosevelt Robinson took his bat and with a mighty swing delivered a permanent and lethal blow to America’s apartheid system of Jim Crow. He took the field for freedom, justice and equality, and played aggressively and courageously for the advancement of Black people.
In 1947 when Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier becoming the first Black ball player to play major league baseball in the modern age, Black America and White America were forced to envision not just Blacks playing next to whites on ball fields, but Blacks obtaining greater civil and human rights, more fully integrating all aspects of American society. His was an opening inning of a long tumultuous struggle which would take Blacks from being mere almost invisible spectators to active players from the bedroom to boardrooms, from living room televisions to lunch and dinner counters in public facilities.

The Nubian News Talks With
Mayor Reed Gusciora

by Bernard Shabazz
There was a big crowd at Starbucks the morning TNN met with Mayor Gusciora in January.
Mayor: The Starbucks here in downtown Trenton helps generate customers for surrounding businesses. Customers discover the other businesses and restaurants in the vicinity.
TNN followed up with the mayor about public safety in Trenton.
TNN: It’s good that 12 Trenton police have been promoted to lieutenant and sergeant. It’s not so good that Trenton is not ready to accept a woman as a chief of police. Although there are 212 female police chiefs throughout the country including Cathy Lanier, Police Chief of metropolitan Washington DC.

See the complete online edition of the February 1, 2019

 

 

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