Community leaders demand removal of Central park monument honoring racist doctor

At a time when neo-Nazis, white nationalists and hateful right-wing extremists run rampant throughout the country with impunity, we must send a definitive message that the despicable acts of J. Marion Sims are repugnant and reprehensible,” Mark-Viverito said. “J. Marion Sims conducted horrific, painful, medical atrocities on non-anesthetized enslaved Black women with free rein.”

What is not in dispute is that between 1845 and 1849, in a makeshift hospital he built in his backyard, Sims inaugurated a long, drawn-out series of excruciating, experimental gynecological operations on countless enslaved African women. This was all done without the benefit of anesthesia or before any type of antiseptic was used. Many lost their lives to infection. It is their story that history has failed to tell and their legacy of courage and endurance that should be honored, not their captor’s. … Source

 

Source: Elected officials, community leaders demand removal of Central park monument honoring controversial doctor

The Most Racist Statue in America Is in … Pittsburgh, and It’s the Most Ridiculous Magical Negro You’ll Ever See 

There are times, like when watching footage of what happened in Charlottesville, Va., that racism bombards the senses like a virus, leaving your skin sore, your soul hardened and your spirit fatigued; a disillusioning, full-body wizening that disrupts, destroys and (occasionally) ends lives.

Source: The Most Racist Statue in America Is in … Pittsburgh, and It’s the Most Ridiculous Magical Negro You’ll Ever See 

Here are New Jersey’s top 24 hospitals, as ranked by U.S. News & World Report

The annual U.S. News and World Report rankings are out. Here’s the top 24 Jersey hospitals.

Source: Here are New Jersey’s top 24 hospitals, as ranked by U.S. News & World Report

The death of the internal combustion engine

“HUMAN inventiveness…has still not found a mechanical process to replace horses as the propulsion for vehicles,” lamented Le Petit Journal, a French newspaper, in December 1893. Its answer was to organise the Paris-Rouen race for horseless carriages, held the following July. The 102 entrants included vehicles powered by steam, petrol, electricity, compressed air and hydraulics. Only 21 qualified for the 126km (78-mile) race, which attracted huge crowds. The clear winner was the internal combustion engine. Over the next century it would go on to power industry and change the world.

But its days are numbered. Rapid gains in battery technology favour electric motors instead (see Briefing). In Paris in 1894 not a single electric car made it to the starting line, partly because they needed battery-replacement stations every 30km or so. Today’s electric cars, powered by lithium-ion batteries, can do much better. The Chevy Bolt has a range of 383km; Tesla fans recently drove a Model S more than 1,000km on a single charge.

Source: The death of the internal combustion engine

Also See: https://www.thestar.com/business/2017/07/07/volvos-decision-to-go-electric-should-spark-industry-change-wells.html

https://www.thestar.com/business/2017/07/05/volvo-to-ditch-combustion-engines-switch-to-electric-by-2019.html